Grocery apps in New York City might have to tone down promises of ultra-fast deliveries. The New York Postreports city Councilman Christopher Marte plans to introduce a bill that will ban these apps from advertising 15-minute delivery times. The estimates encourage couriers to violate traffic laws and put people at risk, Marte said.The bill should be ready within the next few weeks. It would be part of a larger legislation bundle tackling grocery apps. Marte said he was pressing for bills that would provide more benefits and protections to delivery workers, but hasn’t shared more details.The potential law comes as competition for fast deliveries heats up in New York. Services like Gorillas, Fridge No More and Jokr already boast of 15-minute delivery times, and DoorDash is piloting a similarly quick service in Manhattan. In many cases, the services manage speedy deliveries by shopping within a small radius and using full-time employees instead of gig workers.However, they also follow a small but growing string of e-bike accidents in NYC. At least 20 people died in collisions linked to e-bikes in 2020. The bill won’t guarantee the safety of delivery workers, but it might reduce the chances that they’ll gamble with their health to arrive on time.

Grocery apps in New York City might have to tone down promises of ultra-fast deliveries. The New York Postreports city Councilman Christopher Marte plans to introduce a bill that will ban these apps from advertising 15-minute delivery times. The estimates encourage couriers to violate traffic laws and put people at risk, Marte said.

The bill should be ready within the next few weeks. It would be part of a larger legislation bundle tackling grocery apps. Marte said he was pressing for bills that would provide more benefits and protections to delivery workers, but hasn’t shared more details.

The potential law comes as competition for fast deliveries heats up in New York. Services like Gorillas, Fridge No More and Jokr already boast of 15-minute delivery times, and DoorDash is piloting a similarly quick service in Manhattan. In many cases, the services manage speedy deliveries by shopping within a small radius and using full-time employees instead of gig workers.

However, they also follow a small but growing string of e-bike accidents in NYC. At least 20 people died in collisions linked to e-bikes in 2020. The bill won’t guarantee the safety of delivery workers, but it might reduce the chances that they’ll gamble with their health to arrive on time.

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