The myth of the ‘First TikTok War’Kaitlyn Tiffany, The AtlanticThe Russian invasion of Ukraine is playing out over social media, with varying degrees of facts depending on who is delivering the information. Through the lens of previous conflicts, Tiffany examines if the label of “The First TikTok War” is accurate for current world events based on the platform’s design or if that moniker even matters. “If something is new, then maybe it can be different,” she writes. “But to look for that difference in the offerings of a technology company is obviously sad and misguided.”Ten years ago, ‘Journey’ made a convincing case that video games could be artLewis Gordon, The RingerA game that was made in rebellion against commercial titles showed a more artistic side. Designed to “hit you right in the feels,” as Gordon writes, Journey kicked violence and point totals to the curb. These days a creative approach that can impact you like a good book is more commonplace, but video games with such an emotional effect didn’t really exist back then. Dreaming of suitcases in spaceDaisuke Wakabayashi, The New York TimesCalifornia-based startup Inversion thinks it can expedite deliveries of goods around the world by dropping them from space. The current plan is to develop a capsule by 2025 that’s not much larger than a few carry-on suitcases and capable of doing the job.

The myth of the ‘First TikTok War’

Kaitlyn Tiffany, The Atlantic

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is playing out over social media, with varying degrees of facts depending on who is delivering the information. Through the lens of previous conflicts, Tiffany examines if the label of “The First TikTok War” is accurate for current world events based on the platform’s design or if that moniker even matters. “If something is new, then maybe it can be different,” she writes. “But to look for that difference in the offerings of a technology company is obviously sad and misguided.”

Ten years ago, ‘Journey’ made a convincing case that video games could be art

Lewis Gordon, The Ringer

A game that was made in rebellion against commercial titles showed a more artistic side. Designed to “hit you right in the feels,” as Gordon writes, Journey kicked violence and point totals to the curb. These days a creative approach that can impact you like a good book is more commonplace, but video games with such an emotional effect didn’t really exist back then. 

Dreaming of suitcases in space

Daisuke Wakabayashi, The New York Times

California-based startup Inversion thinks it can expedite deliveries of goods around the world by dropping them from space. The current plan is to develop a capsule by 2025 that’s not much larger than a few carry-on suitcases and capable of doing the job.

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