Victrola has made a somewhat surprising move into high-end, streaming-capable turntables over the last few years, and it’s showing off the latest in the lineup at CES 2024. The Victrola Stream Sapphire is a $1,499 turntable with “premium” components and materials that can connect to Sonos and Roon streaming systems and also supports the Universal Plug and Play protocol (UPnP). It can also output up to 24-bit/48kHz lossless FLAC audio. 
Getting beyond the jargon, this means that the Stream Sapphire can output your vinyl to a Sonos system once it’s set up on the same network as your Sonos speakers. I’ve tried this with the Stream Carbon turntable from 2022 and it works pretty seamlessly and is easy to set up, so I wager the Sapphire will be similarly straightforward. 
As for Roon, it’s a more complex, server-based system that pulls together music files and streaming services and broadcasts them to compatible speakers and output devices. The variety of hardware you can use is much larger than the Sonos ecosystem, but it sounds like Roon support works the same way. Once you get the Sapphire connected to your Roon setup in Victrola’s Stream app, the turntable will output audio to whatever speakers are in that setup. And since Roon integrates with other protocols like Apple AirPlay and Google Chromecast, you should be able to send the turntable’s audio to devices like the HomePod or any Chomecast-compatible speakers. Similarly, any speakers or audio receivers that support UPnP can output audio from the Sapphire, as well. 
The Stream Sapphire has a few other upgrades over the existing Stream turntables as well. Probably most notable is that it uses the Ortofon 2M Blue cartridge, compared to the 2M Red. The Sapphire also has a lovely walnut veneer over its MDF and aluminum body, and it has the same high-end carbon fiber tonearm and aluminum platter as the Stream Carbon. It also has adjustable-height aluminum feet with a sound-dampening base to help reduce vibration and make sure the turntable is level on whatever surface it sits on. And, in a nod to the traditional, it has gold-placed RCA jacks for hooking up wired speakers.
This turntable follows the $800 Stream Carbon, which can send music to Sonos speakers; Victrola followed that up with the more affordable $600 Stream Onyx at CES 2023. Since then, the company also announced the Hi-Res Carbon and Hi-Res Onyx, two turntables that opt for Bluetooth or aptX wireless audio output. I really enjoyed using the original Stream Carbon with my Sonos system when I first tested it, but even that felt like a niche device — I’m wondering how big of a market there is for a $1,500 wireless turntable, but Victrola now has a pretty wide range of streaming record players at this point, from the Hi-Res Onyx that’s currently selling for $300 all the way up to the new Sapphire. Victrola says the Stream Sapphire will be on sale this spring.
We’re reporting live from CES 2024 in Las Vegas from January 6-12. Keep up with all the latest news from the show here.This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/victrolas-latest-streaming-turntable-the-stream-sapphire-costs-an-eye-popping-1499-170037014.html?src=rss

Victrola has made a somewhat surprising move into high-end, streaming-capable turntables over the last few years, and it’s showing off the latest in the lineup at CES 2024. The Victrola Stream Sapphire is a $1,499 turntable with “premium” components and materials that can connect to Sonos and Roon streaming systems and also supports the Universal Plug and Play protocol (UPnP). It can also output up to 24-bit/48kHz lossless FLAC audio. 

Getting beyond the jargon, this means that the Stream Sapphire can output your vinyl to a Sonos system once it’s set up on the same network as your Sonos speakers. I’ve tried this with the Stream Carbon turntable from 2022 and it works pretty seamlessly and is easy to set up, so I wager the Sapphire will be similarly straightforward. 

As for Roon, it’s a more complex, server-based system that pulls together music files and streaming services and broadcasts them to compatible speakers and output devices. The variety of hardware you can use is much larger than the Sonos ecosystem, but it sounds like Roon support works the same way. Once you get the Sapphire connected to your Roon setup in Victrola’s Stream app, the turntable will output audio to whatever speakers are in that setup. And since Roon integrates with other protocols like Apple AirPlay and Google Chromecast, you should be able to send the turntable’s audio to devices like the HomePod or any Chomecast-compatible speakers. Similarly, any speakers or audio receivers that support UPnP can output audio from the Sapphire, as well. 

The Stream Sapphire has a few other upgrades over the existing Stream turntables as well. Probably most notable is that it uses the Ortofon 2M Blue cartridge, compared to the 2M Red. The Sapphire also has a lovely walnut veneer over its MDF and aluminum body, and it has the same high-end carbon fiber tonearm and aluminum platter as the Stream Carbon. It also has adjustable-height aluminum feet with a sound-dampening base to help reduce vibration and make sure the turntable is level on whatever surface it sits on. And, in a nod to the traditional, it has gold-placed RCA jacks for hooking up wired speakers.

This turntable follows the $800 Stream Carbon, which can send music to Sonos speakers; Victrola followed that up with the more affordable $600 Stream Onyx at CES 2023. Since then, the company also announced the Hi-Res Carbon and Hi-Res Onyx, two turntables that opt for Bluetooth or aptX wireless audio output. I really enjoyed using the original Stream Carbon with my Sonos system when I first tested it, but even that felt like a niche device — I’m wondering how big of a market there is for a $1,500 wireless turntable, but Victrola now has a pretty wide range of streaming record players at this point, from the Hi-Res Onyx that’s currently selling for $300 all the way up to the new Sapphire. Victrola says the Stream Sapphire will be on sale this spring.

We’re reporting live from CES 2024 in Las Vegas from January 6-12. Keep up with all the latest news from the show here.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/victrolas-latest-streaming-turntable-the-stream-sapphire-costs-an-eye-popping-1499-170037014.html?src=rss …Read More

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